The Veil of St. Veronica, ''Mandolin'', handmade Russian icon, Moscow. Middle 18th Century.
The Veil of St. Veronica, ''Mandolin'', handmade Russian icon, Moscow. Middle 18th Century.
The Veil of St. Veronica, ''Mandolin'', handmade Russian icon, Moscow. Middle 18th Century.
Russian icon

The Veil of St. Veronica, ''Mandolin'', handmade Russian icon, Moscow. Middle 18th Century.

Regular price $14,999.99 $0.00
Tax included.

Icon of The Veil of St. Veronica.

Handmade Russian icon, Moscow. Middle 18th C. (1720-1750)

The icon is in very good condition. It is made in four different levels, 

First wood, second canvas, third gold leaf and fourth the painting level.

Size: 36x31 cm, 14x12.2 inch. 

The Veil of Veronica, or Sudarium (Latin for sweat-cloth), often called simply "The Veronica" and known in Italian as the Volto Santo or Holy Face (but not to be confused with the carved crucifix Volto Santo of Lucca), is a Christian relic of a piece of cloth which, according to tradition, bears the likeness of the face of Jesus not made by human hand (i.e. an acheiropoieton). Various existing images have been claimed to be the "original" relic or early copies of it.

The final form of the Western tradition recounts that Saint Veronica from Jerusalem encountered Jesus along the Via Dolorosa on the way to Calvary. When she paused to wipe the blood and sweat (Latin sudor) off his face with her veil, his image was imprinted on the cloth. The event is commemorated by the Sixth Station of the Cross. According to some versions, St. Veronica later traveled to Rome to present the cloth to the Roman Emperor Tiberius, and the veil, possessing the Grace of God, was able to quench thirst, cure blindness, and even raise the dead.

The story is not recorded in its present form until the Middle Ages. During the fourteenth century it became a central icon in the Western Church; in the words of art historian Neil Macgregor: "From [the 14th Century] on, wherever the Roman Church went, the Veronica would go with it." The act of Saint Veronica wiping the face of Jesus with her veil is celebrated in the sixth Station of the Cross in many Anglican, Catholic, Lutheran, Methodist, and Western Orthodox churches.

 


More from this collection